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Parsha

Masei

Parsha Masei

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Masei  מַסְעֵי is the forty-third parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the tenth and last reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Masei is the second half of the sixth double portion – parsha Matot-Masei.  Double parsha Matot-Masei is read as a combined reading every year except on leap years.

Masei  מַסְעֵי is translated as “journeys“.

Masei מַסְעֵי is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Matot

Parsha Matot

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Matot מַּטּוֹת is the forty-second parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the ninth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). It is the first half of the sixth double parsha. It is read with parsha Masei except on leap years.

Matot מַּטּוֹת is translated as “tribe“. Strong’s defines as “a staff“, “rod“, “shaft“, “branch“, “a tribe“.

Matot מַּטּוֹת is the fourth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) in the second verse.  It is the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Pinchas

Parsha Pinchas (Pinechas)

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Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the forty-first parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the eighth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).

Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the son of Eleazar the son of Aaron; Aaron’s grandson in today’s vernacular. His name is of uncertain origin. Yoel HaLevi, Bible historian and Orthodox Jew, states in his podcast, “Pinchas is a unique name and some people link these name to Egyptian names (He is discussing several names)….. What is very interesting here is the Egyptian names continued in the house of the priests. We see generations later in the house of Eli the name Pinchas shows up again and actually relates to maintaining certain names in the family.

Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the fifth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Balak

Parsha Balak

Balak בָּלָק is the fortieth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the seventh reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Since, Chukat and Balak is a double reading then the aforementioned stats could change a little but we are sticking to this type of counting the parsha readings.

Balak בָּלָק  is the name of the king of the Moabites. Stong’s defines as “devastator“. The Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew defines the three letter root as “destroy“, “render uninhabitable“. The extended meanings are “destroying” or “devastating” with a reference to Isaiah 24:1.

Balak בָּלָק is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Chukat

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Chukat חֻקַּת is the thirty-ninth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the sixth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Chukat and Balak is the first double reading of Bamidbar. Chukat חֻקַּת  is translated as “the law” “the ordinance“, “the statute“, or “the custom“. Artscoll translates it as “the decree“.

Chukat חֻקַּת is the seventh word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Korach

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Korach קֹרַח is the thirty-eighth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fifth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Korach קֹרַח is translated as “Korah”, “Korach“, or “Qorah“. This is a proper name it is kinda’ standard in how it is translated. The various spellings deal with the tradition of how letters are translated.

In the Strongs and BDB you will see baldness ?, or to make bald, as the definition of this name. This is not the true meaning. See, in Hebrew, letters  are added to the beginning or ending of a root word. This will change the meaning of the word. Here by doing this it can take on the meaning “to make bald” or “to shear“. Also changing the vowel points creates new words.

According to the Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew,  (a kosher source) the letters ק qoph, ר resh, ח chet (קרח) means “cohere“. The extended meanings are (1) “balding”, (2) “smooth interior garment” (3) “frost; hold together” so strictly speaking here this word does not mean “balding” or “to make bald”.

Korach קֹרַח is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Shelach

Parsha Shelach

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Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is the thirty-seventh parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fourth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).  Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is translated as “send for yourself” “Send for thee“, “Send“, “Send thou“, “send for thee“. Artscoll translates it as “Send forth for you“.

Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is the fifth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Beha’alotcha

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Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is the thirty-sixth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the third reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).  Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is translated as “when you step up”, “when you erect“, “when you ascend “, “when you arrange“, “when you kindle“,  “In thy causing“, “When you mount” or “when thou lightest“.

Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is the ninth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Tazria-Metzora

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  • 1 min read

Tazria תַזְרִיעַ is translated as “she conceives”.

Parsha Tazria תַזְרִיעַ It is made up of 3,667 Hebrew letters, 1,010 Hebrew words, 67 verses, and 128 lines in a Torah Scroll. 1

Metzora מְּצֹרָע is translated as “one being diseased”.

Parsha Metzora מְּצֹרָע It is made up of 4,697 Hebrew letters, 1,274 Hebrew words, 90 verses, and 159 lines in a Torah Scroll 2

Parsha Shemini

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Shemini שְּׁמִינִי is the twenty-sixth portion in the annual reading and the third in Leviticus (Vayikra) וַיִּקְרָא . Shemini is translated as “eighth”; it’s the third word in the text.

Parsha Shemini שְּׁמִינִי parsha summary

For about a half of year, Israel as a whole, were constructing the tabernacle (mishkan).  In parsha Shemini, we pickup after the seven days of installing the priesthood; it is now the eight day.  Therefore, it is time for Aaron and his sons to inaugurate the first service. We see the first offerings given. Then tragedy hits, Nadav and Avihu is struck down for offering an inappropriate gift. The next events deals with this issue and finishing and complete  the “sin” offering.  The remainder section is dealing with the laws of animals that may be consumed by the children of Israel.