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Parsha Ki Tisa

Parsha Ki Tisa

Parsha Ki Tisa כִּי תִשָּׂא is translated as “when you elevate”. It’s the twenty-first Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and ninth in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found fouor different spellings – “Ki Tisa”, “Ki Tissa”, “Ki Thissa”, or “Ki Sisa”

Parsha Ki Tisa Summary

Parsha Ki Tisa begins with Yehovah telling Moses a man must ransom his soul during the census.

We continue with the instructions for the bronze basin. Following this the details and commands about the anointing oil is provided.

We shift away from the details of construction to the craftsmen. Yehovah names the two Spirit (Rauch) filled men – Bezalel and Oholiab. Bezalel is from the tribe of Judah and Oholiab is from the tribe of Dan.

The Shabbat is given to Israel as a perpetual covenant as a sign between Yehovah and Israel forever. We are told Moses is given the tablets of the Testimony.

The tragedy of the golden calf occurs. Moses breaks the tablets of the Testimony. Moses attempts to purge the sin from the camp. He also try’s to atone for the people but Yehovah rejects it. Yehovah instructs Moses to take the people to the promised land.

We return to the Mishkan (tabernacle) and its location. Moses cries out to see G-d’s glory. They proceed to have a conversation. Yehovah commands Moses to return once more to Mount Sinai to receive the Testimony again.

We are given the thirteen attributes of G-d. The exclusive Covenant with the children of Israel is given to Moses. He returns to the people with a veiled face.

Ki Tisa כִּי תִשָּׂא are the first and second words and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Tetzaveh

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Parsha Tetzaveh

Parsha Tetzaveh תְּצַוֶּה‎ is translated as “you shall command”. It’s the twentyth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and eighth in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found four different spellings – “Tetzaveh”, “Tetsaveh”, “T’tzaveh”, or “T’tzavveh”.

Parsha Tetzaveh Summary

Parsha Tetzaveh begins with the command for the children of Israel to bring pure olive oil for the menorah (candlestand).

Aaron and his sons are set apart as the kohanim (priests). The instruction for their garments is described.  It begins with the ephod, breastplate of judgement, a blue robe, plate of gold attached to a turban, a tunic and linen under garments.

Next, the instructions to consecrate Aaron and his sons as the kohanim is detailed.

Finally, the details for the construction of the incense altar are provided. Aaron’s daily role with the altar of incense and menorah are given.  Aaron’s annual atonement ritual is mentioned and closes this parsha.

Tetzaveh תְּצַוֶּה‎ is the second word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Terumah

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Parsha Terumah

Parsha Terumah תְּרוּמָה‎ is translated as “offerings”, “contributions” or “gifts”. It’s the nineteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and seventh in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found four different spellings – “Terumah”, “Terumoh”, “Terimuh”, or “Trumah”

Parsha Terumah Summary

Parsha Terumah begins with Yehovah giving instructions to Moses. He is to speak to the children of Israel to voluntarily set aside an offering (gift or contribution) to Yehovah. He provides a list of items for the offering and the reason for it. Yehovah states he will give a “blueprint” of the Mishkan and its furniture to Moses.

Next Yehovah provides information about the items that contain gold: (1) the ark, (2) the table and its tools, and (3) the Menorah (candlestand). After these comes the bronze and textiles items; (1) the curtains, (2) the altar and its tools, and (3) the courtyard.

Terumah תְּרוּמָה‎ is the twelfth word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Mishpatim

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Parsha Mishpatim

Parsha Mishpatim תּֽוֹלְדֹ֥ת is translated as “laws”. It’s the eighteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and sixth in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. 

Parsha Mishpatim Summary

Parsha Mishpatim begins with the laws of the Hebrew slave. According, to the Sefer ha-Chinuch there are a total of 53 laws in this portion. There are twenty-three positive and thirty negative commands. The last command given before the narrative continues is “do not make any covenant with the people in the land or their gods.

Parsha Mishpatim’ narrative continues with this command from G-d, “Come up unto the LORD, thou, and Aaron, Nadab, and Abihu, and seventy of the elders of Israel; and worship ye afar off.” It ends with Moses entering the cloud of G-d’s glory on mount Sinai for forty days and nights.

Mishpatim מִּשְׁפָּטִים is the second word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Yitro

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Parsha Yitro

Parsha Yitro יִתְרוֹ‎ is translated as “Jethro”. It’s the seventeenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and fifth in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found five different spellings – “Yitro”, “Yithro”, “Yisroi”, “Yisrau”, or “Yisro”

Parsha Yitro Summary

Parsha Yitro begins with Yitro’s advice to Moses. YHVH speaks to Moses several times preparing him and Israel for His “appearance on Mount Sinai. YHVH gives the ten words.

Yitro יִתְרוֹ‎ is the second word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Beshalach

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Parsha Beshalach

Parsha Beshalach בְּשַׁלַּח is translated as “When he sent out”. It’s the sixteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and fourth in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found three different spellings – “beshalach”, “beshallach”, or “beshalah”

Parsha Beshalach Summary

Parsha Beshalach picks up the narrative of the exodus of the children of Israel from Egypt. We see the pillar of cloud and fire leading them day and night. There are three paths God could lead them, He chooses the path of least military resistance.

Moses keeps the promise of taking Joseph’s bones out of Egypt. We have the showdown between the Pharoah, Baal, the god of the desert, and the God of Israel – Yehovah. After the defeat of the gods Moses and Miriam sing a song commemorating the victory.

Parsha Beshalach also discusses the bitter water being sweet, the manna from heaven, and the attack from the Amalek.

Beshalach בְּשַׁלַּח is the second word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Bo

Parsha Bo

Parsha Bo  בֹּא is translated as “Go!”. It’s the fifteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and third in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus.

Parsha Bo Summary

Parsha Bo begins with YHVH discussing the Pharaoh’s heart with Moses. He explains release of the locusts on Egypt. Following this next two judgements are darkness and the death of the first born.  The lamb sacrifice and the Passover is introduced.

Bo בֹּא is the fifth word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Vaeira

Parsha Vaeira

Parsha Vaeira וָאֵרָא‎ is translated as “and I appeared”. It’s the fourteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and second in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found three different spellings – “va’era”, “va’eira”, or “vaera”

Parsha Vaeira Summary

Parsha Vaeira begins YHVH introducing himself to Moses as the God of Abraham, the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob. He informs Moses, they did not know him as YHVH. YHVH recalls the covenant promise of the land of Canaan. He charges Moses and Aaron with the task of speaking to Israel and the Pharaoh. Parsha Vaeira contains the first seven plagues released on the Egyptians.

Vaeira וָאֵרָא‎ is the first word in the third verse in chapter six. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Shemot

Parsha Shemot

Parsha Shemot שְׁמוֹת is translated as “names“. It’s the thirteenth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle and first in sefer Shemot, the book of Exodus. I found three different spellings – “shemot”, “shemoth”, or “shemos”

Parsha Shemot Summary

Parsha Shemot begins with a list of Israel’s descendants who went into Egypt. Israel increases in number. Pharoah becomes fearful of their numbers and their allegiance to Egypt. He goes through a series of enactments to prevent Israel’s continued population growth.

In the middle, Moses is born and adopted into the Pharaoh’s house. Later he kills and Egyptian beating on a Hebrew. He flees Egypt to Midian. He meets Jethro’s daughters and then Jethro. Jethro gives him Zipporah. Moses becomes a shepard tending Jethro’s flocks.

Moses sees a burning bush not consumed by the fire. He approaches it. YHVH speaks to him. They have a conversation. YHVH commissions Moses of a task. Then sends him to meet his brother Aaron. Finally in Egypt he begins the task given to him. Parsha Shemot ends with God informing him the hand of the Lord is about to be loosed on the Pharaoh.

Shemot שְׁמוֹת is the second word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Vayechi

Parsha Vayechi

Parsha Vayechi וַיְחִי is translated as “And he lived” and is the twelveth Torah reading in the annual reading cycle. There are three ways to spell “Vaychi”, “Vayechi”, or “Vayhi

Parsha Vayechi Summary

Parsha Vayechi begins with a 147 year-old Jacob dying. He asks Joseph to swear to place his body in Machpelah. He agrees. Jacob blesses Manasseh and Ephraim. Then Jacob blesses his sons. Jacob dies and Joseph buries him in Canaan. Joseph promises his brothers everything is good. Joseph’s grandsons are born. Joseph dies.

Vayechi וַיְחִי is the first word and in the Hebrew text (see text below).