Parsha Chukat

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Chukat חֻקַּת is the thirty-ninth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the sixth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Chukat and Balak is the first double reading of Bamidbar. Chukat חֻקַּת  is translated as “the law” “the ordinance“, “the statute“, or “the custom“. Artscoll translates it as “the decree“.

Chukat חֻקַּת is the seventh word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Korach

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Korach קֹרַח is the thirty-eighth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fifth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Korach קֹרַח is translated as “Korah”, “Korach“, or “Qorah“. This is a proper name it is kinda’ standard in how it is translated. The various spellings deal with the tradition of how letters are translated.

In the Strongs and BDB you will see baldness ?, or to make bald, as the definition of this name. This is not the true meaning. See, in Hebrew, letters  are added to the beginning or ending of a root word. This will change the meaning of the word. Here by doing this it can take on the meaning “to make bald” or “to shear“. Also changing the vowel points creates new words.

According to the Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew,  (a kosher source) the letters ק qoph, ר resh, ח chet (קרח) means “cohere“. The extended meanings are (1) “balding”, (2) “smooth interior garment” (3) “frost; hold together” so strictly speaking here this word does not mean “balding” or “to make bald”.

Korach קֹרַח is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Two Doubles in Shelach

I hope you are having an exceedingly good day today!

This is our second installment of a series of posts about the double count Hebrew words. In this installment we are doing a basic word study using both kosher and non-kosher dictionary sources.

Parsha Shelach contains two double counts. One deals with Joshua and Caleb’s report of the land. The other deals with HaShem dealing with the bad report from the other spies.

Let’s look at them now…

Shelach

Parsha Shelach

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is the thirty-seventh parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fourth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).  Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is translated as “send for yourself” “Send for thee“, “Send“, “Send thou“, “send for thee“. Artscoll translates it as “Send forth for you“.

Shelach שְׁלַח-לְךָ is the fifth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Three Doubles in Beha’aloscha

  • Articles
  • 3 min read

No this is not tennis; its Hebrew. Hebrew is like no other language. Deeper studies are very nuanced and sometimes the Rabbis examine the letters, their shapes, the space they occupy and even the space they don’t occupy. It creates some very interesting ideas.

Once while studying for this website I was looking at Hebrew stats — word counts and similar stuff.  I noted a stat called “double count”. I was clueless; so I asked around about this stat and this is what was told to me.

Inverted Nuns in Parsha Beha’alotcha – Video

  • Videos
  • 1 min read

The masoretic text has some nuances; such as the inverted nun. There are many such nuances in a Hebrew scroll. Some of them are even traditions. The inverted nuns were one of the first ones I discovered. Through the centuries teachings have developed about these nuances. Too see two such traditions take a look at the video and additional article.

The 5 Mitzvot in Parsha Beha’alotcha

  • Articles
  • 4 min read

Rambam and others have created lists of the 613 mitzvot (commandments) of the Torah. The mitzvot are scattered throughout the Torah. There are five of them in parsha Beha’alotcha.

  • Three of them are positive and two are negative
  • Four of them are given in direct correlation of the second Pesach offering
  • The fifth one is repeated in two verses

This is another one of those things I really wanted to have a compiled list. I will begin here because, “why not?” I will include the Scripture, English translation,  whither it’s positive or negative, the number it is on the list and other small details I can quickly find about them.

Before we jump into the list, I must explain …

Parsha Beha’alotcha

  • Parsha
  • 1 min read

Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is the thirty-sixth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the third reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).  Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is translated as “when you step up”, “when you erect“, “when you ascend “, “when you arrange“, “when you kindle“,  “In thy causing“, “When you mount” or “when thou lightest“.

Beha’alotcha בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ is the ninth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Paul Inside of Judaism Pt. 11

  • Studies
  • 1 min read

Show Summary: In the eleventh Facebook livestream on the “Hebraic Study of Romans” page we are discussing “Paul Inside of Judaism Part 11 : Saul, Paul who art thou? X”. We discuss Paul’s and the Jewish Law. We discuss:

  1. The meaning of  the word “Torah”
  2. Paul’s audience at Rome
  3. Binding and Loosing
  4. and much more

This episode ends with some housekeeping stuff.