Parsha Lech Lecha

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Lech-Lecha לֶךְ־לְךָ֛ is translated as “go”, “leave!”  but it literally means “go for you”. It can be spelled, “lech-lecha”, “lekh-lekha”, or “lech-l’cha”

In parsha lech lecha we begin the story of Abram. He is told to leave his family in Babylon and his physical and spiritual journey begins. He travels to Egypt, his nephew separates from him, he goes to war, meets Melechizedek. Then God promises a son, He has a child with Hagar. It ends with Abraham and his whole household entering into a covenant by circumcision.

Lech-Lecha לֶךְ־לְךָ֛ is the fifth and sixth words and in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Noach

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Parsha Noach נֹ֔חַ is the second reading in Bereshit and the annual reading cycle. This parsha contains many familiar stores (1) the building of the ark, (2) the flood, and of course the (3) tower of Babel.

There are several interesting facts concerning the Hebrew text. This parsha can be considered the longest pasha in one way. It has the most sentences (verses) of any Torah portion but it does share this honor with parsha Vayishlach (Bereshit 32:4-36:43). More amazingly it does not contain the most letters. That honor belongs to parsha Miketz (Bereshit 41:1-44:17). Parsha Vayeira (Exodus Shemot 6:2-9:35) has the most words.

Noach נֹ֔חַ is the third word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Parsha Bereshit

  • Parsha
  • 1 min read

Bereshit בְּרֵאשִׁית is the parsha of first. It is the first parsha of the annual reading cycle. Also it is in the first book of Moses and the first word in the Torah.  The meaning of Bereshit has been discussed on the Introduction of Genesis.

See the Hebrew text below.

Yom Kippur Song List

  • Videos
  • 1 min read

Mercy / Rachem   Vehi She’amda   Avinu Malkeinu   Ana Be’choach  

Kol Nidre

  • Prayers
  • 2 min read

The Kol Nidre is a controversial Aramaic prayer. Many Rabbis tried to prevent this prayer from the tradition. Although for the most part it is now accepted tradition from time to time the controversy still appears. Although it is suppose to be chanted many just read it as a personal confession.

Watch this brief video explaining this prayer.

Matot-Masei

Parsha Matot – Masei

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

This week have a double parsha reading. This is the sixth of seven possible double readings and the second in Numbers (BeMidbar).  We are reading Matot מַּטּוֹת – Masei  מַסְעֵי  When we have double readings the daily readings change. Sometimes, the halftorah reading changes too.

Here we will combine all the stats and information. However, if you are interested in the numbers for each parsha we have created individual posts for them. See them below:

Now lets look at those stats.

Masei

Parsha Masei

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Masei  מַסְעֵי is the forty-third parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the tenth and last reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Masei is the second half of the sixth double portion – parsha Matot-Masei.  Double parsha Matot-Masei is read as a combined reading every year except on leap years.

Masei  מַסְעֵי is translated as “journeys“.

Masei מַסְעֵי is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Matot

Parsha Matot

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Matot מַּטּוֹת is the forty-second parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the ninth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). It is the first half of the sixth double parsha. It is read with parsha Masei except on leap years.

Matot מַּטּוֹת is translated as “tribe“. Strong’s defines as “a staff“, “rod“, “shaft“, “branch“, “a tribe“.

Matot מַּטּוֹת is the fourth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) in the second verse.  It is the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Pinchas

Parsha Pinchas (Pinechas)

  • Parsha
  • 2 min read

Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the forty-first parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the eighth reading in Bamidbar (Numbers).

Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the son of Eleazar the son of Aaron; Aaron’s grandson in today’s vernacular. His name is of uncertain origin. Yoel HaLevi, Bible historian and Orthodox Jew, states in his podcast, “Pinchas is a unique name and some people link these name to Egyptian names (He is discussing several names)….. What is very interesting here is the Egyptian names continued in the house of the priests. We see generations later in the house of Eli the name Pinchas shows up again and actually relates to maintaining certain names in the family.

Pinchas פִּינְחָס is the fifth word (counting the hyphenated words as one word) and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).

Balak

Parsha Balak

Balak בָּלָק is the fortieth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the seventh reading in Bamidbar (Numbers). Since, Chukat and Balak is a double reading then the aforementioned stats could change a little but we are sticking to this type of counting the parsha readings.

Balak בָּלָק  is the name of the king of the Moabites. Stong’s defines as “devastator“. The Etymological Dictionary of Biblical Hebrew defines the three letter root as “destroy“, “render uninhabitable“. The extended meanings are “destroying” or “devastating” with a reference to Isaiah 24:1.

Balak בָּלָק is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).