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Parsha Haazinu

Parsha Haazinu

Parsha Haazinu הַאֲזִינוּ‎ is the fifty-third parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the tenth reading in Deuteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Witness. 

Haazinu הַאֲזִינוּ‎ is translated as “listen”.

In English, Haazinu can be spelled 3 ways: (1)Haazinu, (2)Ha’azinu, or (3)Ha’Azinu

Haazinu הַאֲזִינוּ‎  is the first word and the first distinctive word in verse 1. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Vayelech

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Parsha Vayelech

Parsha Vayelech וַיֵּלֶךְ‎ is the fifty-second parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the eight reading in Deuteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Witness. 

Vayelech וַיֵּלֶךְ‎ is translated as “And he went”.

In English, Vayelech can be spelled 7 ways: (1) Vayelech, (2) Vayeilech, (3) VaYelech, (3) Va-yelech, (4) Vayelekh, (5) Wayyelekh, (6) Wayyelakh, or (7) Va-yelekh

Vayelech וַיֵּלֶךְ‎  is the first word and the first distinctive word in verse 1. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Nitzavim

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Parsha Nitzavim

Parsha Nitzavim נִצָּבִים is the fifty-first parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the seventh reading in Deuteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Sanctions: the blessing and the curses of the treaty. 

Nitzavim נִצָּבִים is translated as “standing (witnesses)”.

In English, Nitzavim can be spelled 6 ways: (1) Nitzavim, (2) Nitsavim, (3) Nitzabim, (4) Netzavim, (5) Nisavim, or (6) Nesabim

Nitzavim נִצָּבִים   is the second word and the first distinctive word in verse 9. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Ki Tavo

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Parsha Ki Tavo

Parsha Ki Tavo כִּי-תָבוֹא is the fifth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the sixth reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Stipulations – the Specific Provisions of the treaty. 

Ki Tavo כִּי-תָבוֹא is translated as “when you enter“.

In English, Ki Tavo can be spelled 5 ways: (1) KI TAVO, (2) KI THAVO, (3) KI TABO, (4) KI THABO, and (5) KI SAVO

Ki Tavo כִּי-תָבוֹא is the second and third words and the first distinctive word in verse 1. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Ki Tetze

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Parsha Ki Tetze

Parsha Ki Tetze כִּי-תֵצֵא is the forty-ninth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fifth reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Stipulations – the Specific Provisions of the treaty. 

Ki Tetze כִּי-תֵצֵא is translated as “when you go out“.

In English, Ki Tetze can be spelled 7 ways: (1) K-I T-E-I-T-Z-E-I, (2) K-I  T-E-T-Z-E-I, (3) K-I T-E-T-S-E, (4)K-I T-H-E-T-Z-E , (5) K-I T-E-S-E, (6) K-I T-E-T-Z-E-Y, or (7) K-I S-E-I-T-Z-E-I

Ki Tetze כִּי-תֵצֵא is the first word and the first distinctive word in verse 10. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Shoftim

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Parsha Shoftim

Parsha Shoftim  שֹׁפְטִים is the forty-eighth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fourth reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha is the Stipulations – the Specific Provisions of the treaty. 

Shoftim שֹׁפְטִים is translated as “judges“.

In English, Shoftim can be spelled 2 ways: (1) S-H-O-F-T-I-M, and (2) S-H-O-F-E-T-I-M.

Shoftim שֹׁפְטִים is the first word and the first distinctive word in verse 18. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Reeh

Parsha Reeh

Parsha Reeh רְאֵה is the forty-seven parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the fourth reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha the Stipulations – the General Provisions ends in 11.32. We begin the Stipulations – Specific Provisions in 12.1 and continues through the remainder of the parsha. 

Reeh רְאֵה is translated as “see“.

In English, Reeh can be spelled 4 ways: (1) R-E’E-H, (2) R-E-E-H, (3) R’E-I-H, AND (4) R-E-E

Reeh רְאֵה is the second word and the first distinctive word in verse 26. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Ekev

Parsha Ekev

Parsha Ekev עֵקֶב is the forty-six parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the third reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha contains the Stipulations – the General Provisions.

Ekev עֵקֶב is translated as “as a result“. JPS translates is as “because“. BDB provides four definitions (1) as a consequence of, (2) because, (3)  reward, or (4) end. 1

In English, Ekev can be spelled 6 ways: (1) E-I-K-E-V, (2) E-K-E-V, (3) E-K-E-B, (4) E-Q-E-V (5) A-I-K-E-V, AND (6) E-Q-E-B

Ekev עֵקֶב is the second word and the first distinctive word in verse 12. See the Hebrew text below.

Notes:

  1. The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon  2012, Hendrickson Publishing, Massachusetts, pg 784, S# 6118

Parsha Vaetchanan

Parsha Vaetchanan

Parsha Vaetchanan וָאֶתְחַנַּן is the forty-fifth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the second reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, this parsha contains the reminder of the Historical Prologue and about half of the General Provision Stipulations for the renewed covenant.

Vaetchanan וָאֶתְחַנַּן is translated as “And I pleaded“. The JPS translates it as “And I besought“.

Vaetchanan וָאֶתְחַנַּן is the first word and the first distinctive word in verse 23. See the Hebrew text below.

Parsha Devarim

Parsha Devarim

Parsha Devarim דְּבָרִים is the forty-fourth parsha in the annual reading cycle. It is the first reading in Dueteronomy (Devarim). As per Rabbi Sacks, This parsha contains the Preamble and the beginning of the Historical Prologue for the renewed covenant.

HaDevarim הַדְּבָרִים is translated as “the words“. It has been shortened to “words

HaDevarim הַדְּבָרִים is the second word and the first distinctive word in the Hebrew text (see text below).